Publishing Day

The day my book releases is an odd day for me. Inside, I am screaming, “My book is out! Everybody, my book is out! Are you going to untitledread it, or what?!” I walk into the bookstore and pretend to only casually check that it’s on the front table. If it’s not, I pretend not to be bothered. I decrease my expectations. I walk towards the women’s section and just hope to see it on the shelf. If it’s not, I pretend to understand, but inside, I don’t understand at all.

Because it’s my heart on the page.

I went through this with my first book, Girl Perfect, and I just went through it again with Beautiful Lies. In the days of the release, something in me wants people to stop and take notice, and that part of me wrestles with the part that knows the act of creating is worth it, whether anyone notices or not.

I hope the late nights, the honest tears, and the sweet victories of finding just the right words to speak my soul’s hunger will result in profundity for the reader. I want my efforts to matter. In fact, I’m tempted to tell you how I crawled through the thickest mud of my adult life to bear this book. But Annie Dillard, in The Writing Life, scolded me about this, warning me never to tell anyone how much a book cost me personally – for it is impolite to do so.

So with the release of a book, three tragic flaws in the self must die. First, the part of us that hungers for recognition has to die to the Spirit in us that is compelled to speak honestly and truthfully into a world that needs our voices.  Second, the humanity in us that wants millions to hear the book’s message must die to the Spirit in us that rejoices if one life is purely changed by our words.

Finally, we have to let go of “perfect” and embrace gratitude instead. The perfectionistic questions that circle on publishing day – “Is it enough?” “Did I say everything I wanted to?” “Will the reader understand my heart’s lineage?”  and “Is this as beautiful an offering as I dreamed?” – all of these questions must yield to gratitude.

untitledSo here is mine: Thank you, God, that I had the opportunity to bleed truth on these pages. Thank you for the healing it brought to me. Thank you that you love me so much as to give my heart’s desire wings, and I commit these books to you, trusting your winds will carry their words wherever they need to flutter. Beautiful Lies is my offering. My alabaster jar. And when I poured its oil, it was all for you.

What about you? What do you have to embrace and let go of on publishing day? What are the needs for recognition or perfection that you battle? What does your gratitude sound like?

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About jenniferestrickland

Jennifer is an inspirational author, speaker, and founder of U R More, a ministry that teaches people their value, identity and purpose in Christ. In her earlier days, she was a professional model who appeared in Vogue and Glamour and walked the runways of Europe. Since leaving the modeling industry, Jen has written Beautiful Lies, Pretty From the Inside Out, and other books that teach women to see themselves through God's eyes. Her work has been featured at Willow Creek, Saddleback, and around the world. But most importantly, she is a mother to three amazing kids who range from teen to toddler, and the wife to her best friend Shane, who won her with his Southern charm. (And she can cook a mean spaghetti!) To find out more about her ministry, go to www.urmore.org.

12 thoughts on “Publishing Day

  1. Jennifer—just Wow. So good! My next book is about to be released here in a few weeks, and i’m already tense, worried, even though my theology can cover all of that. But you’re so right—when our work hits the world we have such expectations, even though reality has already tempered us. But when we are tempered by the Spirit instead, then there’s hope for us. Congrats on your new book—and I know it WILL change many more than one person’s life!!

  2. Beautifully said, Jennifer. And that’s no lie. I just might have to quote you – no one has described author angst better.

  3. Another ‘wow’ from here, Jennifer. I’m not to ‘book published day’ yet, however, pondering your words gives one a sense of what it truly means to have a servant [writer] heart. Thank you! And may you be abundantly blessed as you entrust your words to the work of the Spirit.

  4. I publish (as often as I can) in the magazine world, and even on my blog i STILL feel, every time i post, that my “baby” is out there. I find myself obsessively re-reading my posts and articles, waiting for commentary and such… and then i slooooowwwly close my laptop and pray: “Lord, thank you for blessing me with passion to write and to share, on the page, my life. Thank you for this gift.” It is amazing how that helps me refocus. All for Your glory! 🙂
    PS: thank you for this website!! it’s a gift!

  5. “I hope the late nights, the honest tears, and the sweet victories of finding just the right words to speak my soul’s hunger will result in profundity for the reader.” ain’t that the truth.

  6. Beautifully spoken, Jennifer! I’ve also acknowledged the “human” desires I have regarding my work, and I still daily battle to conclude that it is for the Lord to use however He wants, even if millions don’t read it, even if I don’t become a well-recognized author. I like that…my work is an alabaster jar, poured out for the Lord’s glory. Amen!

  7. Oh, Jennifer, I hear you all too well. My book-baby released Nov 1st and I haven’t stopped marketing it…just hoping that ONE MORE person can read it. But every time I get all wrapped in a web of numbers and rankings, I have to remind myself of those people who have already read and taken something important away from my story. And I pray for those who ARE reading it. Great point about not sharing what each story costs you personally…the words alone will bring your heart journey to life. EXCELLENT post, girl. Following you now.

  8. Pingback: The Measuring Stick On Publishing A Book | Lee Wolfe Blum Lee Wolfe Blum

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