10 Things You Should Know About the Writing Life

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Original Image Credit: Engin_Akyurt/Pixabay

 

Recently, a friend mentioned that she was thinking about writing—as in pursuing it as a career.

“I mean, how hard can it be, right? I like reading books and I’ve always wanted to write one. I believe I can do it.”

Should I tell her? Should I prick that golden bubble of innocence with a cold, hard dose of truth?

I knew by the stars in her eyes she envisioned something far different from the nitty-gritty, day in, day out, nuts and bolts thing we know as writing.

“And I know it’ll take work, but I don’t mind work.”

The more she talked about the written word, the more animated she grew.

As it so often goes with conversations like this, my friend went on for several minutes, espousing her lifelong wish to pen the novels of her heart.

“Sounds like the writing bug’s bit you, for sure.” I remembered those feelings.

And then I remembered others. The bittersweet ones that are tough to swallow, but necessary in the learning curve.

I tempered my thoughts with some polite niceties, but then my friend pressed.

“Okay, Cindy. Tell me. What are you not saying? What’s something I should know about the writing life?”

“It’s a unique calling…”

“But?”

“No buts. That has a negative connotation. Let’s say andAnd writing’s something that will always matter.”

Here are 10 more things I eventually told my friend about the writing life.

1.      Writing will consume you. You’ll learn to juggle your passion through trial and error. There’s no shortcut around experience.

2.      Writing will test your mettle. Emotionally. Physically. Spiritually. Professionally. Rise above pettiness. Seek wise counsel. Stay the course.

3.      Writing will challenge your comfort zones. Expect it. Accept it. You’ll write best beyond those zones.

4.      You won’t always love writing. Some days you may hate it. Don’t worry. That will pass. If it doesn’t, rethink writing.

5.      Writing with publication as your goal demands time. Sometimes lots of it. Months. Years.

6.      Writing is lonely sometimes. Align your troops—those go-to souls who get your art.

7.      Realize writing is a different medium. One size doesn’t fit all. In fact, the writing life rarely makes sense to those who don’t live it.

8.      Writing is an honorable calling. When naysayers tell you otherwise (and they will), remember who you’re writing for.

9.      Writing will shred your self-confidence. God will restore it.

10.    The writing life will change you. You won’t live with what if. You’ll write it.

Melissa Tagg once said this and I asked permission to quote her.

“It’s so true that writing is a lot of work. It takes research and dedication and so much stubbornness it’s not even funny. But man…it is also soooo fun and so filled with magical moments. And there’s a divine mystery to it. Because for all the craft books and classes and conferences that help us grow as writers, we can’t force those perfect nights when the story starts telling itself…the characters start breathing…and the plot comes alive. That’s when I know there’s something more than my own brain at work. That’s when I know I’m not doing this storytelling thing alone.”

 

*This post first appeared on my blog.

What have you discovered about the writing life?

Does your current career path align with your heart’s desire?

If not, what steps are you taking to correct that?

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Cynthia writes Heartfelt, Homespun Fiction from the beautiful Ozark Mountains. A hopeless romantic at heart, she enjoys penning stories about ordinary people facing extraordinary circumstances.

“Cindy” has a degree in psychology and a background in social work. She is a member of ACFW, ACFW MozArks, and RWA.

Cindy loves to connect with friends at: http://www.authorcynthiaherron.com/

She also hangs out here:

http://www.twitter.com/C_Herronauthor

http://www.facebook.com/authorcynthiaherron

http://www.pinterest.com/cynthia_herron/

For love, fun, and encouragement ~

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Facing Distractions and Discouragement

How do you respond to distractions and discouragement when you’re seeking direction?

Writing my first book initiated one of the most intense spiritual battles of my life. I worried about my family—especially my seven grandchildren.

I had not been available for their needs with all my blogging, speaking, and writing. Guilty thoughts saturated me like a heavy rainstorm. And worry encompassed me like a dark thundercloud overhead.

Then, a Word broke through the storm clouds like a ray of sunshine: “[T]here is no condemnation for those who belong to Christ Jesus” (Rom. 8:1 NLT).

My husband, Dan, had scheduled his retirement date just weeks before the deadline to turn in my book manuscript. So my direction faltered, and my thoughts were like a honeybee, flitting flower to flower. Lord, how will I ever finish this book in time?

I completed my book, but not without spiritual battles. Ephesians 6 offers us this truth:

Be prepared. You’re up against far more than you can handle on your own. Take all the help you can get, every weapon God has issued, so that when it’s all over but the shouting you’ll still be on your feet. Truth, righteousness, peace, faith, and salvation are more than words. Learn how to apply them. You’ll need them throughout your life.
God’s Word is an indispensable weapon. In the same way, prayer is essential in this ongoing warfare. (Eph. 6:13–17 The Message)

What scriptures have helped you during the spiritual battles of your writing life?

What I Learned from Writing a Book in Nine Days

Ghostwriter I tackled something for the first time this year — a ghostwriting project. I must admit, it feels odd to have penned an entire body of work that very few people will ever know I am associated with. The crazier part? I wrote the entire first draft in nine days. Nine. Days!

This is not something I recommend, nor do I wish to attempt another nine-day writing project again. However, I learned some interesting things by writing a book in less than ten days.

  • I am capable of writing from anywhere. But after being sequestered in another state, without the security of my own tools in my own space, I now have a greater appreciation for my happy writing place.
  • Without realizing it happened, I had taken the ability to write for granted. But after working with a person who had a great concept without the skills to communicate it clearly, I was reminded how much other people struggle with words. Even stringing simple sentences together is overwhelming for many.
  • What felt like a nearly impossible deadline improved my writing by stretching me beyond my comfort zone. I had to free-write, lack of time left me no choice.
  • You know that writing exercise? Where you imagine someone holding a gun to your head in order to force you to write, motivating you to action? The right paycheck can inspire breakthrough writing as well.
  • I like to think that what I do is not solely an ego-driven practice. But someone else taking credit for the effort, energy, and creative inflections I put into a project? Eek! However, I discovered I am capable of putting myself aside for the greater good of an excellent message.
  • A lot of daily interruptions are truly unnecessary, and when I temporarily focused only on what was essential, it taught me what I could and should cut out of my life permanently.
  • There isn’t enough coffee on this planet to fully overcome the effect of five hours or less of sleep a night. Actually, hot lemon water is much more energizing and mind clearing.
  • Bathing, hair washing, and fresh clothes are niceties but not necessities when you are in the throes of an intense time-sensitive project.
  • Food delivery is my friend. Disposable eating utensils are a life saver.
  • I can now add ghostwriter to my resume.
  • I’ve come a long way in my writing journey, baby. Practice hasn’t made me perfect, (nor will it), but it has made me faster and better.
  • I can do all things through Him who gives me strength.

Have you ever written an entire book in ten days or less? If so, how did you accomplish it? Would you do it again?

Preparing for Your Next Book Launch

Past and Future

Whether you are about to launch your second book or your twelfth book, you have a valuable opportunity to learn from your past publishing experience and prepare for future success. Some aspects of your previous book launch may be worth repeating, while others may need enhanced and upgraded. Consider the following ways to learn from the past and prepare for the future in the publishing world:

  1. Your book launch team: Ultimately, your overall book sales will be as good as the people you recruit to your book launch team. Are they passionate about your topic, committed to spreading enthusiasm about your new book, and connected to other potential readers? Send early copies of your book to those who will take the time to read it and write a thoughtful review. To differentiate between those who will politely accept a book but are unlikely to follow through on writing a review or spreading enthusiasm about your book within their circle of influence and those who will help your book succeed, ask yourself if this person has ever reviewed or promoted anyone else’s book before. The people who have an established track record of reading, reviewing, and promoting books will be most likely to do the same for you and your book. Help the marketing director for your book locate thriving publications in which to place ads for your book. These publications should connect with readers interested in your topic and have wide circulation. Try to time the ads to coincide with any articles you are publishing in a given magazine.
  2. Your publicity team: People need to know that your book exists before they can read it, enjoy it, and benefit from it. The people who serve on your publicity team help people learn about your book. Think of your publicity team as comprised of both formal and informal members. Formal members include the group of publicists at your publishing house. They will set up radio interviews, create press releases, and coordinate dissemination of books to potential reviewers. Work closely with these publicists to make sure the opportunities they send your way are a good fit for your overall goals as a writer. Informal members of your publicity team include anyone who can coordinate speaking engagements in the six months leading up to your book release and in the first year following your book release. They also include anyone who helps you design a newsletter or other promotional materials suitable for emailing or for distribution at conferences or bookstore events. As the author, you will need to coordinate the efforts of both formal and informal publicists for maximum impact on book sales. Give everyone enough advanced notice before a speaking engagement or promotional event so that they can do quality work. Your publicists want to help your book get in the hands of readers, but you are the one responsible for increasing your own book sales.

What have you learned from publishing your previous book that can help your new book succeed?

WordServe News October 2017

Happy Halloween! Exciting things have been happening this month at WordServe Literary.

On the final post of each month you’ll find a list of Water Cooler contributors’ recently released books along with a recap of WordServe client news.

New Releases

Christian George released Volume II of The Lost Sermons of C. H. SpurgeonPart of a multi-volume set that includes full-color facsimiles, transcriptions, contextual and biographical introductions, and editorial annotations, and written for scholars, pastors, and students alike, The Lost Sermons of C. H. Spurgeon will add approximately 10 percent more material to Spurgeon’s body of literature.

Krista Phillips released The Engagement Plot with Barbour’s Shiloh Run Imprint. Perfect for fans of “The Bachelor,” it follows the story of Hanna and Will after Will shatters Hanna’s heart in front of millions on reality TV. When he shows up on Hanna’s home turf in Minnesota, can she find it in her heart to forgive him?

Curt Steinhorst released Can I Have Your Attention?, cowritten with Jonathan McKee. Steinhorst shows business leaders how to cut through the noise and get their employees back to work. Technology has left people spending so much time responding to the interruptions that they’ve lost the ability to focus and do their jobs. Yet, the potential for harnessing the power of your team’s attention has never been greater–if you can capture it.

Glenn and Ellen Schuknecht released A Spiritual Heritage with Kregel. In this guide for raising children to be Christ-following adults and parents, through compelling, insightful stories from parents and grandparents who’ve been in the trenches, the Schuknechts demonstrate why that heart-level connection is so crucial in building long-lasting, connected relationships with a foundation of Christ.

Tiffany Smiling released Your Dream. God’s Plan. Written with Margot Starbuck, it shares Smiling’s story of suffering a stroke in high school that left her paralyzed, and how God convinced her that he could use the broken pieces of her life for a greater plan. It also promises the reader that he has something better in store for you, too–God is writing your amazing story, designed for His glory and your fulfillment.

Joe Wheeler released Christmas in My Heart 26, the latest volume in his long-running series of old-fashioned Christmas stories. Featuring 16 new stories, this anthology offers something for the whole family to enjoy.

New Contracts 

Paul Basden and Jim Johnson signed with Harvest House for the publication of What Do I Tell My Kids About…?, which tackles the toughest topics kids and parents face today and offers wisdom rooted in biblical truths and personal experience to help parents confidently engage their kids in meaningful conversations.

Kathy Berry signed with Kregel for the publication of When Words Fail, a collaboration with Westminster Canterbury Richmond that offers practical information and tools to equip minsters, laypeople, and other members of faith communities to meet the spiritual and pastoral needs of those living with dementia.

Michael and Christopher Ross signed with Harvest House for their next book, “The Kid-Only Guide to Winning in Life.” Packed with faith tips from sports celebrities and written through the eyes of a Christian teen, this tween devotional applies God’s Word to their everyday hangouts: media, gaming, sports, friendships, school, and life on the home front.

Paula Rinehart and Connally Gilliam signed with NavPress for the publication of their book, Exhale. It is due out in the fall of 2019.

Christian George signed with Lifeway for the publication of a 4-volume series, If Spurgeon Still Preached: Modern Sermons from a Classic Author. The first volume will release in 2018.

New Clients

S.M. Carlson, Jason Coombes, and John Starke joined WordServe Literary this month. Welcome!

16 Things I Would Tell My Younger Writing Self

Writer ComparisonsWhen I was starting out, I learned some of my expectations were myth instead of facts. For me, it’s another reminder that there are things in life I don’t know I don’t know, until I experience for myself. Can you relate? In hindsight, there are several things I would tell my younger writing self.

Sixteen Things That Surprised Me As a New Writer

  1. Book signings rarely spur big sales — they’re more hype than help. But good speaking events still consistently drive buyers to your book tables.
  2. Once you succeed as a published author, at least 25% of the people you meet will want you to help them write the book they’ve always dreamed of writing. For free.
  3. You will need to protect your writing time fiercely. The more you achieve, the more other things will try to impede.
  4. Publishing success is not always fair. A good book can struggle to find an audience, while a poorly written book can go viral.
  5. You will probably never feel like your book is truly good enough. But there does come a time you must say, “It’s good and it’s enough.” Otherwise, you’ll never publish anything.
  6. Once you learn the essentials of the writing craft, you will never read someone else’s book in quite the same way.
  7. Some people simply won’t like what you write, no matter how well you’ve penned it. A small percentage will even make their criticism a personal attack, but you must decide in advance to rise above the opinions of others, otherwise, they can crush you. Remember, there are as many varying perspectives as there are various personalities.
  8. There are a lot more givers than takers in the publishing industry — resolve to fall into the giving category, and you won’t have to struggle as much to get.
  9. When you succeed as a writer, a small group of trusted family and friends may accuse you of changing, when in reality, they’ve simply changed their way of looking at you.
  10. Real WritersIt’s often harder to sell books than to write them, until you publish enough titles. The more you write, the more your followers tell their friends, who tell their friends, and so on, and so on. Many writers don’t stick it out that long.
  11. Best sellers are often on the market for two years or more before they catch fire.
  12. Not all retailers that move books are bookstores or coffee shops. A lot of niche shops and online organizational groups can sell plenty of books if the content fits their interests.
  13. No one will care about your book as much as you — not even your publisher. You must take on the role of book advocate for every title you write.
  14. Writing provides the most daunting and thrilling roller coaster of emotions you will ever ride.
  15. You will need to involve yourself with a writer’s community, otherwise you may feel very lonely. Unless someone has experienced this crazy world with the intense interest of a passionate wordsmith, they won’t get it. Don’t hold this against your family and friends.
  16. The average overnight success takes about ten years. But the reward is worth the effort. It’s important not to give up!

What would you teach your younger writing self about the industry or craft?

10 Tips for Building Your Platform With Less Pain

Working on a book?

Yes, it’s true. You have to build your platform to catch the eye of a publisher. And, yes, most of us agree it can be a pain in the patootee, when what we really want to be doing is writing.

Here’s the one thing I know about effective platform-building:

When purposing to build a platform, do what works for you.

You’ll be most successful if you invest your energies in a way that’s live-giving for you.

Your platform-building efforts should align with who you are.

Pay attention to how you’re wired and situated…

  • Are you an introvert or extrovert?
  • Do you enjoy speaking or dread it?
  • Are you free to travel or chained to your home?
  • Do you have the freedom to post on your blog every day, or once a week?

To the extent that you’ll be driving this bus, building platform is about you. But to the extent that you’re inviting others into what you’re doing, it’s not about you! Is your writing and speaking meeting the real needs of the audience you’re building? Are you creating content that has value for them? Are you building relationships and promoting the work of others?

Build your audience by creating great content that has value for them.

…but back to you!

Here’s a list of 10 possibilities—among zillions—to stimulate your imagination for building your platform. Do one or two stand out? What has your name on it? What other ideas do these trigger?

1. Old School Article Writing
Create a list of 20 publications for which you’d like to write and begin pitching! If you have friends who’ve written for these mags, get a good contact name.

2. Easy Social Media Opps
The hard part was  getting the gig and writing the thoughtful article for the online publication.  The easy part will be posting the link on facebook and Twitter. Remember to capitalize on all that work you put into crafting the article. Tweet it 3 or 4 times over several weeks.

3. Go Live on Facebook
Got something to say? Start communicating with your audience. (Yeah…this isn’t for everyone.)

4. Ask For Help
Extend a personal invitation to friends to share something you’ve written. Don’t be all mass-email about. Ask personally.

5. Speak Locally
Volunteer to speak to your local MOPs group, or other gathering that regularly invites speakers. (The venues that don’t pay–like MOPs and many churches–are a great place to build your speaking resume!)

6. Engage Online Communities
Comment on good content you’re reading. Promote the work of others in your field (and make virtual friends!) by sharing valuable links…comment on relevant articles…become strategically involved!

7. Email Signature Line
Make every email count by linking to your site, blog or product at bottom.

8. Make Friends (aka “networking”)
When I read something I enjoy, I often do a quick search online for the writer’s email to send a note about why I liked their work & “friend” them as well. (Note: these are sincere.)

9. Piggyback
If I know I’ll be speaking someplace, I might get in touch with a local church or friend or school that might also need a speaker. (And save $ on travel, too!) Also fair game to have an assistant—or a friend who will do this for you!—make these contacts.

10. Vlogging
When I was blogging, I had a quickie question that I’d ask folks, and they’d answer for about 1 minute while I filmed with my pocket-size flipcam.  These got posted to social media and each one meant one more happy day I didn’t have to write a blog post.

These are jumping-off points. What feels life-giving? What feels death-dealing?

Remember why you’re building your platform.

You are building your platform for the privilege of continuing to be able to communicate with audiences.

That big-picture view is what keeps me tweeting. (Rarely…don’t count them.)

Remember, you don’t have to do everything. Just the next thing.

RESOURCES…
2 must-see resources if you’re a writer who’s serious about building platform…

  1. Michael Hyatt’s book, aptly named Platform.
  2. Rachelle Gardner’s fabulous blog for writers!

This post first appeared on Margot’s blog, wordmelon.com.