Why I Write Inspirational Fiction

People ask me, “Why do you write Christian fiction?” This reminds me of when people ask me, “Why are you just a nurse?”
pragIn reality, they are politely implying that I am too smart and, perhaps, have wasted my time by never going for a medical degree. However, I think the answer to these two questions is the same.

To save lives.

I’m an ER nurse and a suspense author–I do tend toward the dramatic, and this is a dramatic post. But then again, life is dramatic. So is death.

If you’ve ever been in a hospital, you know a nurse is the last line of defense for a patient. We’re the ones that give medication, order tests, make sure patients are at the right place at the right time. Ensure that people who are learning medicine don’t kill you. A seasoned nurse (even if they aren’t super warm and fluffy) is the best asset for a patient next to a competent physician.

What I see in nursing, some days, are last moments. The last moment of life. The last moment of “My life was this…” before hearing a cancer diagnosis. The last moment of peace, maybe for a while.

It surprises me how blase people can be about eternity. They just feel that they know the right answer without having cracked open a Bible or any other holy book. For a Christian, a person who doesn’t invest in investigating life after death is curiously reckless. Like biking without a helmet. Or biking and texting without a helmet (yes, I just saw that last week!).

Since I experience the fragility of life, I want people to be confident in their beliefs about the afterlife. And I know many of us don’t have as many moments left as we think. A novel can be a less threatening way to introduce someone to the concepts of Christianity than handing them a Bible, and yet can still deliver a strong, compelling message.

It’s like pulling someone off the train tracks as the whistle is warning them to move.

Here is my top ten list of why I write Christian fiction:

1. September 11, 2001.
2. The Boston bombing.
3. Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.
4. The child that died of an allergic reaction.
5. The family I helped give a cancer diagnosis.
6. My friend’s brother, who died after being in a vegetative state for 13 years following a motorcycle accident.
7. Christians who are killed/maimed/imprisoned for their faith.
8. Kids in my ER whose families won’t show up.
9. Driving on ice.
10. Moore, Oklahoma tornadoes.

What I’ve seen is that sometimes I can’t stop the train. I can’t stop that moment. What I can do is offer what I think is hope . . . preventative medicine for the ever after.
We as religious people get so caught up in divisive cultural issues. Pro-life/pro-choice. Traditional marriage. Homosexual marriage. Gun control. And I’ll be the first to say, as a Christian, that while I have strong beliefs on each of these issues, my expressing them can pull people away from the true message of why Christ came.

He died. For. You.

That’s it.

So before you decide, do some reading. Whatever method is the least threatening. A novel. A blog post. The Bible.

Just read and see if His message begins to resonate with you.

Before the train whistle blows on your last moment.

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17 thoughts on “Why I Write Inspirational Fiction

  1. Pingback: Why I Write Inspirational Fiction | WordServe Water Cooler | ChristianBookBarn.com

  2. Excellent post, Jordyn. As a medical professional and author, I share your perspective on the fragility of health. Life as we know it can (and does) change in an instant. It is SO important for people to think/plan/believe ahead for that just in case moment, which often happens.

  3. You are so right Jordyn. Several years ago I gave a book by Corrie Ten Boom to a friend who was not a Christian. She told me later that Corrie’s quiet, unassuming manner and unwavering faith changed her life forever. This friend would have never read a Bible if I had given her one – simply because it seems so overwhelming to a non-Christian. If you can change or save just one life with your writing – just as with your nursing skills – it will be worth the many hours researching and being stuck behind a keyboard.

  4. Jordyn, as always, your strong, beautiful words speak to my heart. 9-11 has changed everything for me, having a major impact on my writing. I can only imagine the other things on your list that you’ve experienced.

  5. Your post made me think of the parables of Jesus. He knew that people could be drawn in by a good story, and that a story could change their lives. You are continuing the tradition! Thanks for this post.

  6. Amen, Jordyn!!! You said it better than I could have! I absolutely LOVE Christian fiction, and with medical thrown in, it is THE BEST I can read. Keep doing what you are doing. Let Your Light Shine – wherever you are!!

  7. Thank you, Jordyn. Today at church there was a call for people to serve in Afghanistan as teachers and medical personnel. I sat, tears streaming, thinking how easily my world gets small and focused on my little trials when there is such a bigger picture. I also asked God about my own calling. Writing seemed somehow removed from “real” work. I wrestled a little with that whole how do I see my work, my calling question. That why do I do what I do and do I really make a difference? This is a timely post.

  8. Thank you, so much for this post, for reminding us of the truth: “We as religious people get so caught up in divisive cultural issues. Pro-life/pro-choice. Traditional marriage. Homosexual marriage. Gun control. And I’ll be the first to say, as a Christian, that while I have strong beliefs on each of these issues, my expressing them can pull people away from the true message of why Christ came. He died. For. You. That’s it.”

  9. Wow — just wow! You wrote a “stop and thinker,” Jordyn. In today’s hurried world it’s hard to do, but thank you for making this writer pause and consider why she writes what she writes. (Cue the hearty amen’s to your message.)

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