WordServe News February 2019

As usual, some great things have been happening this month at WordServe Literary!

On the final post of each month you’ll find a list of Water Cooler contributors’ recently released books along with a recap of WordServe client news.

New Releases

The latest title in the 100 Days Devotional Series from Stephen Artburn, 100 Days of Peace Devotional, releases March 1, 2019.

Experience the peace that comes from spending time in God’s presence with this daily devotional! Bound in a beautifully embossed imitation leather and packed with topics from growing in faith to trusting in the Lord, each of the 100 devotions provides a short reflection, a key Bible verse, an inspiring quote, and a prayer that will root your character in God’s Word and show you the importance of building up your character and passing it on to the next generation.

  • Daily devotions on 100 topics that encourage finding peace in God’s care
  • Thought-provoking quotes
  • Powerful prayers inspired by Scripture
  • 5-minute devotions with further study option

Peace can be scarce in these turbulent times. How can you find the genuine peace that Jesus promises us? This daily devotional by beloved author Stephen Arterburn will help you do just that. Each day’s reading encourages you to spend a few minutes thinking about ways that you and God, working together, can overcome your challenges, organize your life, focus your thoughts, and follow the path that your heavenly Father intends for you to take. This devotional contains biblically-based hope for life’s tough times.

Congratulations Kara Powell & Steven Argue on the March 5, 2019 release of Growing With: Every Parent’s Guide to helping Teenagers and Young Adults Thrive in their Faith, Family, and Future from Baker Books.

Parenting that changes your kids and changes you.

Many parents of a teenager or young adult feel as though they’re guessing about what to do next–with mixed results. We want to stay connected with our maturing child, but we’re not sure how. And deep down, we fear our child doesn’t want or need us. But growing up doesn’t have to mean growing apart.

Based on brand-new research and interviews with remarkable families, Growing With equips parents to take steps toward their teenagers and young adults in a mutual journey of intentional growth that trusts God to transform them all. By highlighting three groundbreaking family strategies, authors Kara Powell and Steven Argue show parents that it’s never too early or too late to:

– accept the child you have, not the child you wish you had
– work toward solutions rather than only identifying problems
– develop empathy that nudges rather than judges
– fight for your child, not against them
– connect your children with a faith and church big enough to handle their doubts and struggles
– dive into tough discussions about dating, career, and finances
– and unleash your child’s passions and talents to change our world

For any parent who longs for their kids to keep their roots even as they spread their wings, Growing With offers practical help and hope for the days–and years–ahead.

Congratulations to Jim Burns and Zondervan for the March 26, 2019 release of the paperback version of: Doing Life with Your Adult Children: Keep Your Mouth Shut and the Welcome Mat Out.

If you have an adult child, you know that parenting doesn’t stop when a child reaches the age of eighteen. In many ways, it gets more complicated. Both your heart and your head are as involved as ever, whether your child lives under your roof or rarely stays in contact.

In Doing Life with Your Adult Children, parenting expert Jim Burns helps you navigate the toughest and the most rewarding parts of parenting your grown kids. Speaking from his own personal and professional experience, Burns offers practical answers to questions such as these:

  • Is it OK to give advice to my grown child?
  • What’s the difference between enabling and helping?
  • What boundaries should I have if my child moves back home?
  • What do I do when my child doesn’t seem to be maturing into adulthood?
  • How do I relate to my grown child’s significant other?
  • What does it mean to have healthy financial boundaries?
  • How can I support my grown children when I don’t support their values?

Including positive principles on bringing kids back to faith, ideas on how to leave a legacy as a grandparent, and encouragement for every changing season, Doing Life with Your Adult Children is a unique book on your changing role in a calling that never ends.

Congratulations to author Kathryn Graves and BroadStreet Publishing on the April 2, 2019 release of the new devotional, Fashioned By God

I will praise You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Psalm 139:14 NKJV

True beauty lies within, but no one wants to look like a hot mess!

Fashioned by God is a 30-day devotional that mixes fashion and faith to help you look and feel your best. Each day offers a Bible verse, spiritual lesson, prayer, questions for your heart, actions for your wardrobe, and an inspirational quote from a style icon.

Learn to:
– recognize the difference between fads and fashion,
– honor God with your personal style,
– declutter your closet and your heart,
– outfit your wardrobe with flattering essentials
– combine pieces you already own for new, chic outfits.

You don’t have to dread opening your closet every morning. Master the elements of style and be encouraged to deepen your walk with Christ.

Contracts

Margot Starbuck signed with Thomas Nelson for A Grown Woman’s Guide to Online Dating, due for release early summer 2020.

Shellie Thomlinson signed with Rengery for her book, Regardless, to be released in 2020.

Congratulations to Jeff & Cheryl Scruggs for their contract with Optimism Entertainment, LLC for exclusive motion picture and television rights for I Do Again.

Jamie Sumner signed a two-book deal with Atheneum (Simon & Schuster) for her next two middle-grade novels. They are due to be published in 2020 and 2021.

Anita Agers-Brooks, Kathy Graves, and Karen Jordan signed with Bold Vision Books for their book Woven. Intended to help women untangle difficult emotions and find the confidence, rest, and focus they were created for, it will publish in 2020.

New Clients

TullianTchividjian, Ron Hutchcraft signed with WordServe in February.  Welcome!

What We’re Celebrating

Congratulations to Jamie Erickson  on her new podcast, Mom to Mom – A Podcast for Every Mom For Every Season with Kate Battistelli and September McCarthy. Subscribe today!

Writing About Suffering

One recent evening, a friend told me about her stepmother’s stage 4 cancer, asking for advice on ways to help her. The next morning, I received word another friend was killed in a car wreck. That evening, a different friend’s granddaughter’s baby was admitted to the hospital in an unresponsive state following a seizure. It was an emotional 24 hours. But one reason these friends talked to me about their issues is that they’ve walked with me through my own.

Lessons Learned

Have you ever noticed that when you’re about to write or teach a spiritual lesson, you walk through circumstances that make you confront your own handling of said spiritual lesson? It happens to me almost every week. I teach a weekly Bible study class and I promise you, whatever the lesson is about, I faced it during the previous week!

There is a good reason for this. It’s called authenticity. Nobody wants to listen to a Pollyanna who has never gone through tough circumstances preach about how to handle them. We all know this, but still it can be so easy to spout platitudes or quote Scriptures that seem to say everything will turn out okay.

The Right Approach

What is the right way to approach writing about suffering? Telling your personal story is a good place to start. Every one of us has faced some level of trauma or grief or physical suffering at some point in our lives. When we dare to talk about our deep hurts, it opens our readers’ hearts to hear the rest of our message because they feel a connection to us. We become real when we become vulnerable.

Reward

Therein lies the rub, as they say. It is terrifying to bare your soul to strangers. I submit to you that it may be the most difficult thing you ever do. It may also be the most rewarding thing you ever do. When I share my struggles with those I teach, an inner tension releases that I previously didn’t even know existed. And the connections I make with my class members are priceless. A bond is created that allows for more receptivity on their part.

Respect

I need to add a caveat here. Some things cannot be shared in a public forum. When there are other people involved who might be hurt or embarrassed, we must keep the situation private. We might be able to refer to it in generic terms, but we can in no way include anything that would identify them. The only exception would be if prior permission is granted.

Transparent Honesty

Readers don’t sit in a classroom with us each week and we’ll never know or hear about most of them. But they will listen to us when they read our message and learn the truth we’ve shared when they know we aren’t just spouting words–that we have lived the truth of what we say.

Do you have a message to share that involves difficulty or suffering? How ready are you to be transparent with your readers?

holzfigur-980784_1280