Defining Real Writing Success

The new year has come and gone, and we’re in the full throes of fresh starts, new goals, and updated resolutions. This has me thinking about the definition of success — and more specifically, defining real writing success.

Most authors would say success is selling thousands of books, which means reaching thousands of people. It’s a worthy goal and necessary if you want to write professionally, long-term. But lately, as I’ve considered the time and energy required from an author, I realize the importance of balance. I’ll explain.

The more contracts I sign, as speaking engagements multiply, and because I’m selling more books, I’ve gotten a glimpse of the future. And it can go in one of two ways.

I don’t struggle with self-discipline as some do; instead, lately I’ve noticed my struggle to relax. When I can’t unwind, it’s time to make a change.

I have a choice. I can pour even more of my time and energy into my writing and speaking career, and to a degree, I need to, but I must exercise caution. As a natural workaholic, I could slip into a regular routine of fourteen to seventeen-hour work days. Because of deadlines, commitments, and special opportunities, there are times when I need to pull a writing day like that, but if it becomes the norm, I’m in danger. There’s a fine line between protecting your writing/speaking time and neglecting your family and close friends.

Life is Better with Friends

Recently, I imagined what it might look like to work myself into a frenzy, reaching success as many would define it, only to realize I might stand alone at the top. If we don’t have friends and family to share and celebrate with, what are we working so hard for?

This epiphany has put me on a mission to usher some balance back into my life. I adore the days I get to sequester and write, but I equally love spending down time with my family and friends. Both are valued activities to me, and they deserve equal time.

My work ethics and integrity are intact, but I am choosing to slow down enough to breathe  deeply, while on this crazy, thrilling, and daunting writing ride. To me, defining real writing success is simple.

I have goals to write and sell many more books, but part of my planning strategies now include more time set aside to enjoy walks with friends, cups of coffee with people I respect, and to laugh often with my family. I want to catch up on life, and I believe by doing so, I’ll have even more to write about. I don’t want to “make it” as a writer, only to look around and discover I’m perched in a precarious position — standing all alone.

How do you maintain balance between your writing and real life? 

Advertisements

12 Unique Last Minute Gift Ideas Writers Can Give for Christmas

Has the date snuck up on you? Maybe you were hunkered down all of November to participate in this year’s NaNoWriMo challenge. Or perhaps you’ve got a book deadline, and the focus on your writing sphere has kept you from realizing what’s going on in the real world. Yikes!

If you are a writer who’s run out of time and you still have a list of people to get gifts for, then this post might just give you hope. I’ve compiled some unique gift ideas for writers — since we have the ability to give thoughtful words. Not only are these personalized items special, but they are inexpensive (some nearly free), and they hold the potential to make a lasting impact. So what are you waiting for? Let’s get writing and giving!

12 Last Minute Gift Ideas for Writers

  1. The Story of Us: Write a condensed version of your special moments with the gift recipient, the traits or talents you especially appreciate in them, or a shared dream. How did you meet? Did you watch them enter the world?
  2. 12 Things I Love About You: Write one for each month and print them on cardstock — if you add pictures, you can make a calendar.
  3. Crazy Love Directional Christmas: You can use the sample template here, or write your own from scratch. But however you craft the story, have your family members bring a $10 or less, unisex, wrapped gift for the game. Stand in a circle, and every time the words right, left, back, or forward are read from the story, everyone passes their gift in that direction. When right or left is said, each person should hand off to the person on that side of them. When they hear back, the gift goes back to the person who had it last. Each time forward is said, pass the gift to the person across from you. Whatever you’re holding when the story ends, becomes your gift. 
  4. Dedicate a Blog Post or Series to Your Recipient’s Favorite Cause: In honor of your loved one, spotlight a social issue they care about. 
  5. Write a Personal Tribute or Family History: Write an accolade or look up the origin of family names. Print on decorative paper, then frame for hanging.
  6. Warm Up Cold Cash With a Personalized Touch: Fold up bills and place them and coins in the slots of an empty candy box, like Whitman’s. Add a customized note, that you place on top, using monetary terms to define the way you feel about the relationship. A few lines to consider: You can’t appreciate me a quarter as much as I appreciate you. I’m ten-fold better off because you are in my life.
  7. Money Balloons: This is another unique twist on giving money. Place folded up bills, coins, and appreciation notes inside un-aired balloons, then blow them up no more than a few hours before your special someones will open their gifts.
  8. Blessing Cookies: Make your own fortune cookies with special messages just for the person you’re gifting inside. Instructions here.
  9. Willy Wonka Golden Ticket: Make up your own golden ticket based on something your recipient likes. Include a note about why you want them to have this. Research and write out economical ways to visit one of their dream vacations.
  10. Punny Gifts: Add humor to the holidays and make Christmas a little bright and funny with these delightfully punny gift ideas.
  11. 5 Things That Make Me Grateful I Know You: Write out a gratitude list specific to the person you are gifting. (Use the examples listed below or come up with your own complimentary comments.)
    1. The way you make me laugh
    2. Your kind heart in helping others
    3. Your generosity with strangers as well as friends
    4. Your talent with a hammer and nails
    5. The special way your nose crinkles when you smile
  12. Check Out More Creative Money Ideas here: Just put your special writing twist on whatever you give. The gifts of our words can be the most priceless present of all.

What’s your favorite gift idea from the list? Do you have a unique way to use writing for gifting?

WordServe News November 2017

Exciting things have been happening this month at WordServe Literary!

On the final post of each month you’ll find a list of WordServe authors’ recently released books along with a recap of agency news.

New Releases

Dr. Daniel Amen released Memory Restore with Tyndale. Expert physician Dr. Amen reveals how a multipronged strategy―including dietary changes, physical and mental exercises, and spiritual practices―can improve your brain health, enhance your memory, and reduce the likelihood that you’ll develop Alzheimer’s and other memory loss–related conditions.

Dr. Amen also released Stones of Remembrancea companion to Memory Restore that invites readers to discover the healing power of Scripture meditation and memorization as an intentional spiritual discipline. Remembering God’s acts, promises, and guidelines for living can contribute to a healthy spiritual life and a healthier mind and body as well―reducing stress, increasing brain capacity, and even helping to reverse problems like memory loss.

Stephen Arterburn released 6 Ways for Men to Thrive in Midlife with Aspire. Midlife doesn’t have to be a crisis of identity or a failure in self-confidence. Midlife can be a season of discovering how your past years and present situation are the very stuff that an exciting future is made of. Steve Arterburn offers readers proven strategies and guidance from God’s Word that will set you up to thrive.

Stephen Arterburn also released 7 Ways to Choose Healing as part of the same New Life series with Aspire. The power to heal (emotionally, spiritually, mentally, and physically) is in God’s hands, but the ability to receive his healing touch is your choice. Using biblical principles and trusted counseling advice, this book helps you break the bondage of pain and hurt and guide you towards healing, forgiveness, and freedom.

Jim Burns released Understanding Your Teen: Shaping their Character, Facing their Realities with IVP Books. For teens to become responsible adults, parents need to help them grow to attain a healthy self-identity, establish good relationships, make wise decisions, and grow in their relationship with God. Burns shows how parents can shape behavior and character, navigate social media challenges, and communicate and resolve conflict healthily.

Julie Cantrell released Perennials with Thomas Nelson. In this beautiful novel set in Oxford, Mississippi, two estranged sisters reunite for their parents’ 50th wedding anniversary, where a family tragedy brings unexpected lessons of hope and healing amid the flowers of their mother’s perennial garden.

Donald Stratton and Ken Gire’s bestseller All the Gallant Men was released in paperback this month from William Morrow. The most gripping, intimate, and inspiring account of Pearl Harbor, this first memoir ever published by a USS Arizona survivor is a must-read for all World War II military history buffs.

Joe Wheeler released the 2nd Edition of Abraham Lincoln Civil War Stories with Howard Books. Updated to highlight the character and leadership of Lincoln, this beautiful collection reveals the servant heart of the President, his dedication to those who served him, and his homespun humor and wisdom.

New Contracts 

Ron Moore signed with Regnery Publishing for Finding Your Heart for God, due for publication in early 2019.

Anita Agers-Brooks signed with Kregel for her newest book, Exceedingly: Stories, Skills, and Strategies for Unearthing Your Abundant Purpose—an inspiring guide to help the everyday woman or man answer the burning question of their purpose—unearthing the real reason God made them.

Mary Davis signed with Barbour for her novella, “Zola’s Cross-Country Adventure,” which will be included in the MISSadventure Brides Collection due out for publication in 2019.

Tim Riter signed with Harvest House for his book Easy Riding, due to publish in early 2019.

New Clients

David and Karin Holder, David Muller, and Preston Ulmer signed with WordServe this month. Welcome!

What We’re Celebrating

Dr. Amen’s book Memory Rescue reached #1 on the Amazon best seller list for Aging Medical Conditions & Diseases.

Christian George’s book The Lost Sermons of C. H. Spurgeon Volume I Collector’s Edition was one of the winners of the ECPA Top Shelf Award to promote and recognize outstanding book cover design in the Christian publishing industry. Congrats!

Library Journal listed Krista Phillips’ The Engagement Plot as one of their best books of 2017 for Christian Fiction!

What I Learned from Writing a Book in Nine Days

Ghostwriter I tackled something for the first time this year — a ghostwriting project. I must admit, it feels odd to have penned an entire body of work that very few people will ever know I am associated with. The crazier part? I wrote the entire first draft in nine days. Nine. Days!

This is not something I recommend, nor do I wish to attempt another nine-day writing project again. However, I learned some interesting things by writing a book in less than ten days.

  • I am capable of writing from anywhere. But after being sequestered in another state, without the security of my own tools in my own space, I now have a greater appreciation for my happy writing place.
  • Without realizing it happened, I had taken the ability to write for granted. But after working with a person who had a great concept without the skills to communicate it clearly, I was reminded how much other people struggle with words. Even stringing simple sentences together is overwhelming for many.
  • What felt like a nearly impossible deadline improved my writing by stretching me beyond my comfort zone. I had to free-write, lack of time left me no choice.
  • You know that writing exercise? Where you imagine someone holding a gun to your head in order to force you to write, motivating you to action? The right paycheck can inspire breakthrough writing as well.
  • I like to think that what I do is not solely an ego-driven practice. But someone else taking credit for the effort, energy, and creative inflections I put into a project? Eek! However, I discovered I am capable of putting myself aside for the greater good of an excellent message.
  • A lot of daily interruptions are truly unnecessary, and when I temporarily focused only on what was essential, it taught me what I could and should cut out of my life permanently.
  • There isn’t enough coffee on this planet to fully overcome the effect of five hours or less of sleep a night. Actually, hot lemon water is much more energizing and mind clearing.
  • Bathing, hair washing, and fresh clothes are niceties but not necessities when you are in the throes of an intense time-sensitive project.
  • Food delivery is my friend. Disposable eating utensils are a life saver.
  • I can now add ghostwriter to my resume.
  • I’ve come a long way in my writing journey, baby. Practice hasn’t made me perfect, (nor will it), but it has made me faster and better.
  • I can do all things through Him who gives me strength.

Have you ever written an entire book in ten days or less? If so, how did you accomplish it? Would you do it again?

16 Things I Would Tell My Younger Writing Self

Writer ComparisonsWhen I was starting out, I learned some of my expectations were myth instead of facts. For me, it’s another reminder that there are things in life I don’t know I don’t know, until I experience for myself. Can you relate? In hindsight, there are several things I would tell my younger writing self.

Sixteen Things That Surprised Me As a New Writer

  1. Book signings rarely spur big sales — they’re more hype than help. But good speaking events still consistently drive buyers to your book tables.
  2. Once you succeed as a published author, at least 25% of the people you meet will want you to help them write the book they’ve always dreamed of writing. For free.
  3. You will need to protect your writing time fiercely. The more you achieve, the more other things will try to impede.
  4. Publishing success is not always fair. A good book can struggle to find an audience, while a poorly written book can go viral.
  5. You will probably never feel like your book is truly good enough. But there does come a time you must say, “It’s good and it’s enough.” Otherwise, you’ll never publish anything.
  6. Once you learn the essentials of the writing craft, you will never read someone else’s book in quite the same way.
  7. Some people simply won’t like what you write, no matter how well you’ve penned it. A small percentage will even make their criticism a personal attack, but you must decide in advance to rise above the opinions of others, otherwise, they can crush you. Remember, there are as many varying perspectives as there are various personalities.
  8. There are a lot more givers than takers in the publishing industry — resolve to fall into the giving category, and you won’t have to struggle as much to get.
  9. When you succeed as a writer, a small group of trusted family and friends may accuse you of changing, when in reality, they’ve simply changed their way of looking at you.
  10. Real WritersIt’s often harder to sell books than to write them, until you publish enough titles. The more you write, the more your followers tell their friends, who tell their friends, and so on, and so on. Many writers don’t stick it out that long.
  11. Best sellers are often on the market for two years or more before they catch fire.
  12. Not all retailers that move books are bookstores or coffee shops. A lot of niche shops and online organizational groups can sell plenty of books if the content fits their interests.
  13. No one will care about your book as much as you — not even your publisher. You must take on the role of book advocate for every title you write.
  14. Writing provides the most daunting and thrilling roller coaster of emotions you will ever ride.
  15. You will need to involve yourself with a writer’s community, otherwise you may feel very lonely. Unless someone has experienced this crazy world with the intense interest of a passionate wordsmith, they won’t get it. Don’t hold this against your family and friends.
  16. The average overnight success takes about ten years. But the reward is worth the effort. It’s important not to give up!

What would you teach your younger writing self about the industry or craft?

Conversations on the Page

The longer I write, the more I realize my best work comes when I use my voice just as I would if I were sitting across from the reader in a relaxed setting. I’m actually imagining you and I chatting together right now, as I pretend we are enthralled in a deep, funny, poignant, or otherwise stimulating conversation.

As an author, seeing my readers in my mind helps me brush away the distractions that hinder me from offering my purest thoughts and most creative ideas — the ones with potential to help, encourage, and inspire people. These are my motives for writing after all.

By personality, I’m a think-out-loud kind of gal, so I’ve discovered a few different ways of exploring thoughts on a particular subject.

  • Schedule time with a friend or family member to discuss the topic in depth.
  • Interview an expert on the point.
  • Record my thoughts into a device, as if I’m talking with someone — then listen back.

What I’ve learned is that conversations across the table translate into great conversations on the page. No matter the method I use, it’s the epiphanies, the insights, and the knowledge born from conversations with real people that provide transformational information I can share with readers of my books.  Some of my best received work is when I write in such a way that the reader almost feels as if they are eavesdropping.

But a true conversation, especially a stimulating one, is a two person event. Listening is as important as speaking. Having a conversation on the page requires paying close attention to the real people in your life and who cross your path. How can we make sure we’re writing on the topics people want to hear? How can we ensure our fictional stories resonate with elements of truth?

By listening with intent.

  • Pay attention to the dialogue between other customers in restaurants.
  • When interviewing, do not dominate or speak over the person you are interviewing.
  • Practice strategic listening when watching TV shows or streaming your favorite program. Not so you can steal their lines, but so your muse can be inspired with new, creative ideas.

In reality, conversations take place all around us in our every day comings and goings. When we become intentionally present and aware, what we hear in our every day lives become relevant conversations on the page, making our messages important to a reading world. After all, it’s living we write about.

What brings out your voice? Does it happen in the presence of other people? When you are alone and listening? Does your best thinking happen out loud or in silence? 

SaveSave

What to Write When You Don’t Know What to Write

Writing blocks rarely hit me because I don’t know what to say. For me, they are usually derived from a mind swarming with ideas. So much so, that I can feel overwhelmed with questions like these:

  • Should I focus on idea A or B today?
  • Just because I’m interested in a topic doesn’t mean anyone else is, right?
  • Is my thinking on this matter completely delusional?
  • I can’t write about __________; people will think __________ about me. Won’t they?

Ah, the battles of insecurity a writer must fight. So how do we wage war against our own fears, those with the power to debilitate us if we aren’t careful?Writing Rules

For me, I’ve had to gulp, choosing to write afraid.

I love what Stephen King said on the matter. “The only requirement to be a writer is to remember every scar.”

The secret to great writing is daring to risk in order to reap greater rewards. 

  • When you aren’t sure whether idea A or B is better, choose one and decide to embrace your own decision.
  • Odds are, if you are interested in a topic, so are other people. If you doubt it, do a quick friend/family and social media poll to test the waters.
  • What sometimes feels delusional to us can feel like “outside the box” thinking to others. Research to see if you can substantiate your premise. Try to imagine how this might come across to someone foreign to the concept. Tell your readers you understand this may sound strange or that they might agree to disagree with you. And don’t forget to ask God what He wants you to say — He is the king of fresh ideas.
  • As Stephen King’s quote reminds us, the inner scars, the deep thoughts, and the vulnerable spaces in our lives are often the ones other people connect with the most. If we hold our tender areas captive, we can’t free someone else who needs permission to release their own fears.

I think most writers struggle with what to write when you don’t know what to write. But you can’t go wrong when your words originate from your soul. Don’t doubt yourself to the point of mental paralysis. Your unique take is as important as your unique voice in expressing your thoughts.

Dare to believe in what you have to say.
Dare to share your innermost thoughts. Dare to trust God with a message he wants you to offer.

What Are You Doing for OthersSo what if every person on the planet doesn’t share your perspective? Some of the greatest minds in history were scoffed at in the beginning. Do your due diligence, then dare to risk so you and your readers reap a greater reward.

What topics could you write afraid? What are you holding back that could help others?